Covid-19 creates a Thanksgiving unlike any other

Calla Shosh, reporter

Manaquin and mask
Covid-19 has affected many student’s Thanksgiving plans. Morgan Whitkop, an NCHS junior says that for Thanksgiving ,“usually I’ll have my aunt, uncle, or grandparent come over. Usually we don’t leave town, but we have sometimes.” When asked if the pandemic has affected her plans she said “For sure, definitely. My family is quarantined so…” . (Calla Shosh)

Thanksgiving is a holiday which commemorates the three day harvest feast of friendship between the pilgrims and the Native Americans, specifically the Wampanoag tribe, according to history.com.  Though the way we celebrate the holiday has changed, the meaning remains the same. 

The first Thanksgiving had a menu quite different from the one seen in the classic Norman Rockwell painting. Instead of turkey, venison; swan; duck; or goose might have been served (history.com). The stuffing might have consisted of berries or nuts instead of bread. Though carrots and peas were served, there might have also been cabbage, spinach, gooseberries, raspberries, and cranberries (though not in sauce form). It is also possible that seafood was served. Mussels with curds was a popular dish, as was lobster. There probably wasn’t any pie or potatoes, though gourds may have been served (history.com). 

This year, however, the differences between the original thanksgiving and the modern one run deeper than food. At the first thanksgiving there wasn’t a Covid-19 pandemic disrupting many aspects of life.  Take for example  Morgan Whitkop, a NCHS junior. She says that for thanksgiving “usually I’ll have my aunt, uncle, or grandparent come over. Usually we don’t leave town, but we have sometimes.” When asked if the pandemic has affected her plans she said “For sure, definitely. My family is quarantined so…” . 

Though not everyone’s plans changed, many are conscious of the effects of the pandemic on others if not on themselves. Karisse Gunther, a NCHS Freshman, is aware of that fact. She says, “We just have dinner with my family in my household.” Even though her plans haven’t changed, she is aware that for others they may have. “I mean they might not be able to travel to see their families.”  

On the other hand, Ella Geisy, an NCHS sophomore believes differently. “We have Thanksgiving at our grandma’s house. While the grownups cook, we kids play video games or have conversations about school.” She says, “It (the pandemic) won’t affect them[other families] dramatically because most families will be able to come and visit family … or just have a nice Thanksgiving.” It won’t affect her plans  “…because most of my family lives here.”

Though this year’s Thanksgiving will be different, there are other ways to be together, such as  video calls or phone calls. Just because we are socially distant doesn’t mean that we have to be alone.